TVCM

This site is currently in limbo. IT serves as an archive of Community Media activity on Teesside going back several years. Some of the older posts may contain broken links. The activity continues such as Community Media Volunteering via DigitalCity Community for Middlesbrough Mela and Stockton Weekender with new events and activities coming along. A new community hub is emerging РEast Cleveland On-Line which will feature an exciting Community Media Channel and a Citizen Journalism Network.

Melorama

To Celebrate 21 years of Middlesbrough Mela we will be launching an exhibition in Teesside University’s Constantine Gallery first week in November. This will feature the “Octorama” principle which consists of 8 screens and 8 sound sources. The screens will feature images and video (VHS) going back 21 years and the sounds will feature sounds recorded in Albert Park and peoples voices. There will also be posters and memorabilia from the past 21 years. We’d like to record as many peoples voices as possible for inclusion. We’re looking for a very short sound clip with your views and memories of the event. Your sound clip (in any language) could be:

  • How long you have been coming to the Mela
  • What is your favourite part of the Mela
  • What do you think was the best year
  • Do you go to other Mela’s
  • What new things would you like to see at the Mela
  • Anything else

Please use the drop box below to record or submit your audio file. Otherwise request a workshop with your group or school by emailing s.d.thompson@tees.ac.uk
Tell us
your story

Some Examples

with thanks to Saeed Iqbal of Emtep

Audio Blogs from Oxford

These two audio blogs are from the “SPICE” Project. Last weekend Teessiders, Londoners and Sheffield people descended on Oxford for the final workshop in the series of four. The good people of Jericho took us on a Thames cruise.

There once was an avenue of Poplars, each 100 feet high with 6 foot wide trunks, running along the bank of the Thames between Oxford and the village of Binsey. One day in 1879 they were cut down. This poem “Binsey Poplars” by Gerard Manley Hopkins was recited by Adrian aboard a canal barge as we cruised the Thames and passed the very spot. It was recorded on my mobile phone and uploaded immediately to Audio Boo. ask me anything There is something quite gratifying to record the poem in that very same place and have it time stamped and geo-located to the exact spot. To see that click here.

[audio:http://audioboo.fm/boos/451284-poem.mp3]

Another geo-located recording comes from one of Mark’s walked around Jericho.

[audio:http://audioboo.fm/boos/451282-jrici.mp3]

Geo-location – click here.

Format

These two audio blogs are from the “SPICE” Project. Last weekend Teessiders, Londoners and Sheffield people descended on Oxford for the final workshop in the series of four. The good people of Jericho took us on a Thames cruise.
There once was an avenue of Poplars, each 100 feet high with 6 foot wide trunks, running along the bank of the Thames between Oxford and the village of Binsey. One day in 1879 they were cut down. This poem “Binsey Poplars” by Gerard Manley Hopkins was recited by Adrian aboard a canal barge as we cruised the Thames and passed the very spot. It was recorded on my mobile phone and uploaded immediately to Audio Boo. ask me anything There is something quite gratifying to record the poem in that very same place and have it time stamped and geo-located to the exact spot. To see that click here.
[audio:http://audioboo.fm/boos/451284-poem.mp3]
Another geo-located recording comes from one of Mark’s walked around Jericho.
[audio:http://audioboo.fm/boos/451282-jrici.mp3]
Geo-location – click here.

Path:

Stockton Weekender Pics

The pictures below are by Christine Wilson. As part of the Community Media Team Christine’s, pictures not are just of bands and performers but of the Community Media Crew themselves as well as many other unsung backstage heroes.

Our web stream is now inactive and the huge stage-side screens that we fed all weekend are long gone. The team have all gone their separate ways. All that is left are memories but they are good ones. Like the half hour or so when a huge storm hit and we all had to take shelter in our steel cabin with lightning striking so close we were in danger of frying. The storm was so bad we didn’t even have a mobile phone signal. We did the only thing we could do – laugh! And boy did we laugh! We told jokes (good and bad), magic tricks (good and bad) and gooned around. ask edd . Adie from YSLV (the screen company) amazed us all by levitating. It even freaked some of us out. I’d swear he was a good two foot off the ground, honest!

The final laugh came when I returned to the location today only to see our media cabin loaded on the truck and leaving the site. I just caught it in time to avert a disaster and we have our cables (not wires !) and stuff for the next time. Here’s to the next time – thanks team.

Steve T

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Stockton Weekender

The Tees Valley Community Media crew made of Teesside University student volunteers will be running and mixing the media to the two massive stage side screens at Stockton Weekender. You can send a tweet to the screens using #swscreen or text to Weekender formerly known as the Fringe takes place down on the riverside stage during the fabulous Stockton International Riverside Festival. We will also be uploading pictures here and hopefully some vox pops. We will also be web streaming some of the on stage action (see below) For details of what is on when click here.

Please note, due to data restraints the web stream will be intermittent. If we’re not live please come back later.

CAMERA ONE


Live broadcasting by Ustream

CAMERA TWO


Streaming video by Ustream

Loftus Anglo Saxon Princess

The posts following this one represent a week long event at Loftus Town Hall. Click here to view these items in the order they were posted

Approximately six years ago Archaeologist Steve Sherlock working with local volunteers made a discovery of International significance. This was in an Iron Age site at Street House near Loftus on land owned by farmer Alan Bothroyd. Spectacular Anglo-Saxon remains were found that made headlines. The team found gold and silver brooches which could be the the only known Anglo Saxon royal burial site in the North of England. What really captured peoples imaginations was the discovery of the grave of an un-named Anglo Saxon Princess.

The finds will be displayed at Kirkleatham Museum but for a week in May 2011 the exhibition will take place in the community where there are likely to be people descended from the Loftus Princess !

The exhibition in Loftus Town Hall is a culmination of hard work by Redcar and Cleveland Council, Loftus Town Council, Kirkleatham Museum, The Local Community, School Children and Steve Sherlock himself. The Exhibition runs at Lofus Town Hall from the 9th to the 13th of May. We’ll bring you pictures and stories from the event plus some excerpts from Steve’s book on this website.


Steve Sherlock Story #3

Here’s the third posting from Steve Sherlock. This is copyright material so please treat accordingly. These pictures will be available in a book from Kirkleatham Museum quiet soon.

Grave 43

Grave 43 was situated next to the bed burial (grave 42) and also contained a spectacular group of objects that are unique to the site. It is thought that the gold, silver and glass jewellery in this grave was worn on a fine thread, possibly cotton, although nothing of this material survived. The jewellery was hung in a pattern that was repeated on each side of a centrepiece of a triangular-shaped gold pendant set with an interesting glass bead. On each side of the pendant was a biconical gold wire bead, followed by a silver sphere or bulla, followed by a silver bead with a pattern of decoration copying the gold wire and then a glass bead at each end. The grave also contained a further gold wire bead and a silver annular brooch. This brooch may have fastened part of the headdress, sometimes called a coif.